• 2013 Art Crawl!
  • 2013 Art Crawl!
  • 2013 Art Crawl!
  • 2013 Art Crawl!
  • 2013 Art Crawl!
  • 2013 Art Crawl!
  • 2013 Art Crawl!

What fun we had at the Art Crawl this weekend! Over 200 people came to visit us! This year we showcased new work from France by Dana Caple Smith and Maggie Schell's "Coming Home" Series. It's been a great collaboration between art and architecture, now in our third year participating in this amazingly vibrant community event! So many talented artists have exhibited this weekend, more info and coverage about the Sunshine Coast Art Crawl here. The photos are by Katherine Penfold, who has done awesome coverage of this year's show! Looking forward to the next one! ...

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Raising the Bar & Freeing the Spine

The shift from an agricultural/industrial economy to a technological economy has greatly expanded the options available to us in terms of work and lifestyle, and yet we struggle with the impact that these sedentary jobs are having on our bodies."People who 'sit down all day' are the members of the working population most susceptible to back pain issues. (...) Researchers found that 59% of the respondents with sedentary jobs and lifestyles are more at risk of having back issues than people who do a great deal of lifting and carrying in their positions."1 Many professions today rely on the use of computers to perform their work and many people can attest that spending 8 hours per day sitting in front of a computer can feel ather unnatural to our bodies.  The results of forcing our bodies into extended periods of sitting often results in slouching, crouching over small screens, putting too ...

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For us the task of design is to reveal the potential of what is already there, making the site and the building become one, integrating the physical with the spiritual, the human with the natural. When we have achieved this balance, we know that our work is complete.

  Somewhere in the balancing between human intervention and nature, in the interplay between the physical built form and the pre-existing building site, emerges an elusive healing quality in architecture. The healing quality of spaces is not something that can be created; it something that is already present and is simply waiting to become manifest. For us the task of design is to reveal the potential of what is already there, making the site and the building become one, integrating the physical with the spiritual, the human with the natural. When we have achieved this balance, we know that our work is complete. ...

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  • West Vancouver Conceptual
  • West Vancouver Conceptual
  • West Vancouver Conceptual

This was a feasibility study that we were commissioned to do in order to demonstrate the potential of a lot for sale in West Vancouver.  It is often worth investigating the site and its possibilities early in the process to ensure that the site is right for its owner.  Topography and sunlight access are just some of the elements that will influence the final design. ...

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Natural light is a valuable asset. For this client's artist studio we explored the performance of skylights versus clerestory windows throughout the year. The results of the solar study turned out to be very telling!

The two options were priced and the framing of the clerestory windows with a beam/rafter system turned out to be a $9,000 premium in the overall budget compared to the option of inserting skylights in between scissor trusses.  So the question came down to, "Are the clerestory windows worth the premium?" And the results of the solar study turned out to be very telling! In the Spring/Fall Equinoxes, the clerestory windows captured the sunlight and directed it at the ceiling, creating a luminous feel to the whole space and diffusing the light down evenly. This effect would be further enhanced with a white or light-colored ceiling.  The skylights, on the other hand, failed to capture much of the sunlight at the Equinoxes due to the shallow angle of the sun.   In the Summer Solstice, the opposite happened. The skylights captured all of the mid-day sun, greatly increasing ...

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How to enclose a rock in a living room? – Stories from the Rockhouse

When anyone first enters the Rockhouse, after a moment of disbelief, they invariably ask, "How on earth did you manage to enclose a rock bluff inside a living room?!" So we decided to share what we learned from this experience in the blog, from the conceptual, practical and technical sides.   I have to say that the largest barrier we had to overcome was the problem of perception rather than technical difficulties. Before we could get anywhere with the idea of enclosing a rock inside a living room in the rainy climate of BC, we had to believe for ourselves that it was possible. I will not underestimate the importance of this first step because nothing could have been accomplished without it. This proved to be very challenging at times when everyone and everything around us seemed to suggest that it could not be done. So the next big step was to convince others of our vision. ...

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